Trump Attorney Reveals Shocking Detail About Trump’s First Day On Trial

OPINION:  This article contains commentary which may reflect the author’s opinion

The jury selection process for the historic criminal trial of former US President Donald J. Trump began on Monday in a Manhattan courthouse. This is the first time that an American president has been in a trial of this kind. Many of the original jury pool members were promptly excused as soon as the proceedings got underway. More than half of the initial 96 potential jurors were eliminated due to their expressed reservations over their impartiality.

In the midst of Trump’s ongoing legal crises, his legal team has voiced serious worries about the impartiality of jury selection. The participation of people who might have ties to the Biden campaign, which could affect how fairly the trial is decided, is at the center of the issues.

Trump’s legal spokesperson, Alina Habba, expressed these worries bluntly in an interview with Benny Johnson. On Monday, the discussion delved into the intricacies of jury selection and the pivotal concerns involved. Early in the conversation, Johnson set the tone by calling the upcoming jury pools “absolutely ratchet,” a description that raised questions about their potential for bias. Habba supported this assessment.

The discussion then veered thoughtfully toward earlier court cases, most notably the O.J. Simpson case, to highlight their concerns over the objectivity of juries. “We’ve just been covering OJ’s death, and there were all these jurors…they’re saying, we knew he killed everyone,”  Johnson said. Habba made reference to particular limitations imposed by Judge Merchan on the jury selection procedure, claiming that these would have a negative effect on the defense’s capacity to guarantee a fair trial.

“One of the things that the judge here, Judge Merchan, would not allow us to ask was whether or not they voted for a Republican or a Democrat.”

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Habba’s revelation that people working for the Biden campaign were admitted to the jury pool for the E. Jean Carroll case compounded the dilemma, since she considered it to be quite troubling. “There’s people that when I was doing the jury selection in the Carroll case, were working currently for the Biden campaign. And I didn’t want those people sitting on a jury for President Trump.”

Regarding the “hush money” payment that Trump’s lawyer made to adult film star Stormy Daniels prior to the 2016 election, the president is accused by 34 states of fabricating corporate records. The former president, who views the lawsuit as a Democratic ploy to prevent him from running for office again, has entered a not guilty plea to all of the accusations. Out of the four criminal charges against Trump, this trial is the first to this point.

The conversation also covered the more general tactics used by defense attorneys to assemble juries that may be sympathetic to their clients. “You know, I mean, that’s my job as a lawyer is to make sure that I get the absolute best jury pool I’m going to get,” Habba said, frankly acknowledging the tactical aspect of such preparations by adding,  “don’t think that the DA team isn’t gonna do the exact same thing.”

The jury’s makeup continues to be a critical factor that might have a big impact on the proceedings and results of these historic trials as Trump’s legal challenges develop.

 

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